Monday, April 20, 2009

The Ultimate Deep Deuce Collection

Welcome to the Ultimate Deep Deuce Collection!
Enjoy your visit. I welcome any feedback.

Click a button for where you want to go (the full article needs to be open).

FLASH MAP. Move your mouse over the map to open pages. I recommend that you press F11 for full screen view. This should eliminate the need for vertical scrolling to see the full flash file on your display. Press F11 again to return to your regular display. If the map "locks up", press F5 to refresh the map. To use the longer list of main articles instead of the map, click here.




ARTICLE LIST. They are these and more will be added as knowledge and time allows:

ABOUT THE COLLECTION. What a presumptuous title! Why "ultimate" and why is my chosen title so damn vain? Well, it contains the most, and most accurate, Deep Deuce content you will find anywhere on the web. Anywhere. It collects and compares, sometimes corrects, written press media and book information previously published, and if the assembled information is ambiguous, in error, or contradictory, and if I know that, this collection says so. A good bit of what's been published states things as "fact" which statements are either erroneous or are not necessarily so. This is also true for some of the articles contained in the generally nice collection of history articles in OHS's Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History & Culture. I'm not at all saying that the project isn't a good one, it is a very good one, particularly in its concept and breath. But, it would be a mistake to assume that all of the content you read there is correct, because it is not. To use that resources' search engine, click here.

While the chosen title of this collection is somewhat immodest, I am, nonetheless humbled by the very generous comments received from two of the best Oklahoma City history buffs and bloggers that there are, Steve Lackmeyer in his OKC Central and Charles G. Hill of Dustbury fame (at this moment, 1,757,021 hits and counting), and to each of them I extend my thanks and appreciation.

I also add that this should be considered a work-in-progress. For example, as a spin-off, it includes a 18-19 page article telling the story of Oklahoma City's Jim Crow laws and this city's attempt to avoid the edicts of the United States Supreme Court and simultaneously placate a bigoted and heavy-handed Governor, Alfalfa Bill Murray, both of which endeavors ended in failure though it was a long time coming. That article is here.

This collection contains two parts: (1) the flash file which appears near the top of this page -- it provides a quick glance at Deep Deuce; and (2) a list of the much larger and more substantive articles which are linked directly to articles below the flash map -- those articles are also accessible through the flash map.

In all, 36 items are presently shown in the map -- I expect that the number will grow. Most are buildings but 4 are areas -- Walnut/Finley Bridge, NE 2nd street Street & Map views, Riverside Park, and Aerial views.

An example page is shown below:


A rounded rectangle appears in the map to show a building's location, together with a transparent red arrow. Click within the rounded rectangle and a web-html page will open which contains more and larger pictures as well as historical information.

Despite my claim for "ultimacy," if I've made mistakes, I want to know so that I can make corrections, so please comment as needed.

Enjoy!

6 comments:

Steve Lackmeyer said...

History is always "a work in progress." Don't let anyone tell you differently, and don't ever apologize for stating the obvious.
Great job.
- Steve Lackmeyer

Doug Dawg said...

Thanks. I apologize.

Joyce said...

IT'S ME AGAIN DOUG DAWG. MY GRANDFATHER CAPP JEFFERSON MOVED TO THE 200 BLOCK OF EAST FIRST STREET AFTER 1899 WHEN HE CAME TO OKLAHOMA. DO YOU HAVE ANYTHING ON HIM? ANYTHING WILL DO AND I CAN FACE BAD THINGS TOO. IT WOULD REALLY BE NICE. THANK YOU IF U CAN. THANK YOU IF U CAN'T. I REALIZE YOU ARE A BUSY MAN.
TRULY, BRENDA LEWIS
bbrendalyouth@aol.com

Doug Dawg said...

Hi, Brenda, I don't mind looking in the Oklahoman's archives for you ... but those archives haven't been working for several days now. I'm going to call on Monday (later today) to see what's up. If I find anything, I'll comment again here.

Anonymous said...

Hi Doug,
I wanted to let you know that in 1920 the Black Dispatch was located at 300 E Second Street according to the City Directory. So it appears to have moved from 1st street to 300 e 2nd and sometime between 1920-1948 was moved to 324 E 2nd.

AP

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