Thursday, March 11, 2010

McLintock, Oklahoma Territory & William Shakespeare

Following up on the theme of last article on 1st National & Bunky and with the same emphasis on the early days before and after the April 22, 1889, Land Run, during a recent insomniac event I went to Hulu to see what I could watch there while I should have been sleeping but could not. There, I ran across a popular movie, McLintock, released in 1963 starring John Wayne and Maureen O'Hara. It being a movie I'd enjoyed many years earlier, I selected it to watch and I'm glad that I did.

But not until that viewing did it sink in that McLintock might be a movie about Oklahoma, scripted as it was in the nature of a historical novel. That glimmer led me to research a bit more and the result is this post which I hope that you will enjoy, in addition to the movie itself. The result of my investigation led me to conclude and say without any hesitation that McLintock is a comedic western tale which has Oklahoma Territory as its setting, and the parts of the story which are presented as historic fact are solidly accurate. The story line itself is based on William Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew ala John Wayne's unmistakable style.

Below, I'm presenting for your viewing a condensed slide-show of the movie without audio which lasts 8-9 minutes but which contains controls so that you can move around or end watching as you will. I've assembled this from 100+ screen captures within the real movie. It contains a summary annotations as well as historical notes along the way. Below that, I've embedded the full 2-hour movie from Hulu's website, for as long as it remains available there. After that, I've added some notes about how the movie measures up to real Oklahoma history. Have fun and enjoy the show!

Doug Dawgz Cut
Click on the graphic to start the 8-9 minute slide show
containing historical notes and the movie summary

McLintock, the Movie
An Oklahoma Territory adaptation of Taming of the Shrew

The 2-Hour Full Movie

From Hulu, for as long as remains available there -- sometimes it isn't
A no-commercial but not wide-screen version is also available at the link below:
Click Here To Play McLintock At The Alternate Location

The Real History. Even though McLintock is an adaptation of William Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew and the story itself is fictional, the story's setting is based upon accurate historical Oklahoma facts.

Click below for a brief 6 minute slide show which explains that.

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Wyocowgirl1 said...

You have done your research well, but you have overlooked one possibility - Wyoming. There are pointy mountains in Wyoming, there are cruel winters in Wyoming, there is a National Park in Wyoming, there is a Green River in Wyoming. Wyoming did not become a state until 1896 and '95 is definitely mentioned in the movie. The only thing Wyoming is missing are the Commanche's, our Indians are Lakota Sioux. So I respectfully submit that Wyoming is a possibility.

Wyocowgirl1 said...

Oops! Wyoming became a state in 1890. Is my face red?

Doug Dawg said...

Thanks for your comments, Wyocowgirl1. But, hey, since the movie is just a piece of fiction, so who can say for sure? References to "Sooners" and "Ft. Sill" are Oklahoma oriented, however.

Anonymous said...

Colorado- In GW's first address to the settlers who want to farm he states that the MESA VERDE was "made for the buffalo, works pretty well or cattle."

Anonymous said...

Mesa Verde is in fact in Colorado, and if you listen to the opening lines from the song, Triple Creek is in fact in Colorado also. They are most likely referring to Colorado. The are a lot of "Holloywood" in the movie, without question. However, those two facts, and the above 6000 ft seems to point to Colorado. Likely Colorado City, Cortz or even Pueblo.

Unknown said...

They talk about west of Denver, when did Oklahoma became west of Colorado I thought it was east. They talk about 6,000 elevation is that Oklahoma elevation? The sooners where brought in by train. The Comanche have to travel to Fort Sill. Have u never heard of "trail of tears".

Anonymous said...

In states in the movie Mesa Verde and 6000 feet above sea level, last I checked Oklahoma is not above 6000 feet above sea level.

Anonymous said...

Also remember that many Southwest Indian tribes were moved to the Oklahoma territory during that time along with Eastern Indian tribes. So the moving referencing Fort Sill in Oklahoma makes sense.